Jack Brink, Visiting Scholar

[Photo credits may be found below]

Visiting Scholar Lecture: Issues and Experiments in Rock Art Conservation

Who: Dr. Jack Brink, Curator of Archaeology at the Royal Alberta Museum, Edmonton, Canada
What: Visiting Scholar Lecture: Issues and Experiments in Rock Art Conservation
When: Tuesday, November 7, at 7:30 p.m.
Where: Humanities Lecture Hall, UNC Asheville

Free and Open to the Public.

The second American Institute of Archaeolgy (AIA) lecture this fall will be presented by Professor Jack Brink, Curator of Archaeology at the Royal Alberta Museum, Edmonton, Canada.   In addition to his work in heritage management and indigenous history for more than 40 years, Professor Brink has conducted archaeological research in western Canada, the United States, the Canadian Arctic, and China. His special areas of interest are the archaeology of the Northern Plains, especially bison hunting, and Aboriginal rock art. Other interests include cultural resource management, Plains archaeology, communal hunting, faunal analysis, large mammal behaviour and anatomy, and Aboriginal relations with archaeology. He received his BA degree from the University of Minnesota and his MA from the University of Alberta. 

Current long-term projects include the analysis and reporting of archaeological materials from the Head-Smashed-In Buffalo Jump site, a study of recording and preserving rock art images at Writing-On-Stone Provincial Park, and developing sound relations between Aboriginal groups of Alberta and the archaeological community. Personal interests include continuing study of large mammal bioenergetics in relation to human hunting and consumption strategies.

Rock art, the focus of his talk at Asheville, is one of archaeology’s most valued yet most fragile resources with beautiful images painted or carved on cliffs and in caves. Rock art is one of the few archaeological resources that do not just tell us what people did, but also what they were thinking.

All rock art in its natural environment is threatened by weathering and vandalism. Professor Brink’s talk, Issues and Experiments in Rock Art Conservation, discusses ways that rock art might be preserved longer by both active and passive measures. Using the spectacular rock art site of Writing-on-Stone in western Canada, experiments in rock art conservation are presented; controversial issues about intervention will be discussed, and the varying opinions of First Nations people regarding the long-term fate of visual vestiges of their past.

Dr. Brink's visit is sponsored by the AIA and the Departments of ART/ARTH and Classics.

His talk will be on Tuesday, November 7, at 7:30 p.m, in the Humanities Lecture Hall. 
Free and Open to the Public.

For information: Dr. Laurel Taylor, ltaylor@unca.edu, 828.251-6290.

Photo Credits and Image Identification

Photo credit and additional resources

John (Jack) W. Brink, courtesy of AIA https://www.archaeological.org/lecturer/johnwbrink

The view north along the top of the cliffs at Head-Smashed-In Buffalo Jump, a World Heritage Site in Alberta, Canada. Photo taken with a Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ20. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Head-Smashed-In_Buffalo_Jump#/media/File:Head-Smashed-In_Buffalo_Jump-27527-2.jpg

Outcrops of the Foremost Formation along the Milk River. Outcrops of the basal part of the Foremost Formation from Writing-On-Stone Provincial Park. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Foremost_Fm_1.jpg

The Milk River in Writing-on-Stone Provincial Park, Alberta, Canada https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Milk_River_(Alberta%E2%80%93Montana)#/media/File:MilkriverAB.JPG

A path winds through hoodoos in the park, in Writing-on-Stone Provincial Park, Alberta, Canada  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Writing-on-Stone_Provincial_Park#/media/File:Writing-on-Stone_Provincial_Park,_Alberta.jpg Bob Ruiz

The view north along the top of the cliffs at Head-Smashed-In Buffalo Jump, a World Heritage Site in Alberta, Canada. Photo taken with a Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ20. Ken Thomas.

Outcrops of the Foremost Formation along the Milk River  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Foremost_Fm_1.jpg

Outcropping at Milk River https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/9/99/Foremost_Fm_2.jpg

The cliffs at Head-Smashed-In Buffalo Jump  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Head-Smashed-In_Buffalo_Jump#/media/File:Head-Smashed-In_Buffalo_Jump-27527-2.jpg (Ken Thomas)

Petroglyph, Writing-On-Stone, Glyphs Provincial Historic Resource, Writing-On-Stone Provincial Park Alberta Culture and Community Spirit - Royal Alberta Museum, date unknown